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Chemical Derivitization of the Carbon Overcoat on Thin Film Magnetic Recording Disks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115291D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baum, TH: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Currently, manufacturers of thin film magnetic recording media lubricate thin film disks by application of a thin perfluoropolyether (PFPE) layer. The end groups of the PFPE lubricating polymer are often functionalized with a reactive moeity to enhance the adhesion of the polymer chain to the thin film disk, and to achieve a higher density coverage of the lubricant layer. A complementary approach to achieving these attributes is to chemically derivitize the carbon overcoat of the disk. Addition of the appropriate functional groups to the disk surface should increase the number of "bonding" sites for PFPE attachment and improve the integrity of the disk-lubricant interfacial bond. In this work, it has been demonstrated that the carbon overcoat of thin film disks can indeed be chemically functionalized.

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Chemical Derivitization of the Carbon Overcoat on Thin Film Magnetic
Recording Disks

      Currently, manufacturers of thin film magnetic recording media
lubricate thin film disks by application of a thin perfluoropolyether
(PFPE) layer. The end groups of the PFPE lubricating polymer are often
functionalized with a reactive moeity to enhance the adhesion of the
polymer chain to the thin film disk, and to achieve a higher density
coverage of the lubricant layer. A complementary approach to achieving
these attributes is to chemically derivitize the carbon overcoat of
the disk. Addition of the appropriate functional groups to the disk
surface should increase the number of "bonding" sites for PFPE
attachment and improve the integrity of the disk-lubricant interfacial
bond. In this work, it has been demonstrated that the carbon overcoat
of thin film disks can indeed be chemically functionalized.

     Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films of 300Angstrom in thickness
were sputtered (in Argon) using a DC Magnetron source, onto
1-inch-diameter silcon and quartz substrates. These samples were
analyzed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and found to
consist of 85 at. % carbon and 15 at. % oxygen. (Note that the oxygen
present in the films results from exposure of the freshly deposited
carbon to air.) Several reagents were then used to oxidize the carbon
including: (a) chromium (III) oxide in acetic acid, (b) potassium
permanganate in aqueous solution, (c) chromium (IV) o...