Browse Prior Art Database

Icons for Session Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115333D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Becker, CH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of controlling computing session settings by means of a set of drop-and-drag icons.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Icons for Session Control

      Disclosed is a method of controlling computing session settings
by means of a set of drop-and-drag icons.

      A set of session-control icons is provided in a common window
or bullpen area on the screen.  Each icon pictorially represents a
potentially desired effect to be performed on one of the other open
sessions or windows on the screen.  The user picks an icon
representing
the function he would like to apply to the target window (for
instance,
adding processing power), drags it to the window to be affected, and
drops it there, using the mouse or other pointing device.  The
operating
system interprets this action as if the equivalent command had been
entered manually through a "Window Settings" or similar menu.

      Depending on their particular effects, icons may be either
unlimited-use or single use in nature.  When an unlimited-use icon is
chosen, a replacement icon immediately appears in the bullpen.  When
a single-use icon is chosen, it is not replaced until its effect on a
window is cancelled.  Multiple single-use icons may be available
simultaneously for functions that are not unlimited in nature but
which may be used on several sessions at once.

      In addition to the general method described above, the
following specific icons and their associated actions are disclosed:
  o  Vitamin pill icon - this icon takes the form of an image of a
      vitamin pill.  Various shapes, colors, or markings may be used
      to represent different effects on the system resources (for
      instance, a "vitamin M" pill might increase the amount of
system
      memory dedicated to a particular session).  The user picks as
few
      or as many vitamins in whatever combination is appropriate for
      his current needs.  The vitamin pill effects "wear off" or end
      after a preset amount of time, so the user needs to do nothing
      further to assure that settings will eventually return to their
      previous values.  In a multi-user computing environment, the
      system administrator may use this type of icon to grant special
      resources or privileges to users on a temporary basis.  For
      instance, a user needing to run an intensive compilation may
  ...