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Method to Increase Lubricant Bonding on Thin Film Disks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115381D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baum, TH: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Lubrication of thin film magnetic recording disks is currently achieved by the use of a fluorocarbon oil, such as a Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) polymer. Adhesion of the PFPE polymer to the carbon overcoat of a thin film disk is often insufficient to prevent depletion via spinoff, evaporation, aerosol formation, or displacement by contact with the magnetic recording head. Insufficient lubricant at the head-disk interface can ultimately lead to failure of the magnetic recording device via mechanical damage of the disk surface. In this work, it is demonstrated that the adhesion of the PFPE lubricant to the thin film disk can be enhanced by chemically modifying the protective carbon overcoat via a plasma process.

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Method to Increase Lubricant Bonding on Thin Film Disks

      Lubrication of thin film magnetic recording disks is currently
achieved by the use of a fluorocarbon oil, such as a
Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) polymer.  Adhesion of the PFPE polymer to
the carbon overcoat of a thin film disk is often insufficient to
prevent depletion via spinoff, evaporation, aerosol formation, or
displacement by contact with the magnetic recording head.
Insufficient lubricant at the head-disk interface can ultimately lead
to failure of the magnetic recording device via mechanical damage of
the disk surface.  In this work, it is demonstrated that the adhesion
of the PFPE lubricant to the thin film disk can be enhanced by
chemically
modifying the protective carbon overcoat via a plasma process.

      The surfaces of carbon-overcoated magnetic recording disks were
treated in an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasma reactor using
a mixture of Argon with a variety of reactive gases including oxygen,
sodium peroxide, and ammonia.  The surface composition following
exposure of the thin film disk to either an oxygen or
peroxide-containing plasma showed a marked increase in the amount of
oxygen present at the surface.  In a similar manner, disks exposed to
the ammonia-containing plasma became nitrogenated.  Six oxygen
plasma-treated disks, together with six ammonia plasma-treated disks
and a set of untreated control disks, were dip coated with
approximately
90 Angstroms of a PFPE lubrica...