Browse Prior Art Database

Transport Mechanism for Use in a Fluid Head

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115474D
Original Publication Date: 1995-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bendz, G: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Fluid heads used for processing substrates have no transport mechanism built into them. The substrate edges rest in grooves and are pushed through the head. The sharp edges of the substrates cause the grooves to wear generating debris in the immediate area of the substrate. Some such grooves wear sufficiently that substrates contact the fluid head injectors, causing them to plug with plastic from the fluid head. Also, separate heads are required for each width substrate, adding to equipment expense. Also, present transport speeds are not easily changed, or reversible to have a simplified one-end load/unload, or jog back and forth operation.

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Transport Mechanism for Use in a Fluid Head

      Fluid heads used for processing substrates have no transport
mechanism built into them.  The substrate edges rest in grooves and
are pushed through the head.  The sharp edges of the substrates cause
the grooves to wear generating debris in the immediate area of the
substrate.  Some such grooves wear sufficiently that substrates
contact the fluid head injectors, causing them to plug with plastic
from the fluid head.  Also, separate heads are required for each
width substrate, adding to equipment expense.  Also, present
transport speeds are not easily changed, or reversible to have a
simplified one-end load/unload, or jog back and forth operation.

      The transport mechanism described herein eliminates parts
scraping their way through the heads, and are self adjusting for
various substrate widths, so that only one fluid head is required to
run all size parts.

      The transport comprises two separate #25 chain loos with one
leg of each loop running along one of the two walls of the fluid head
for edge guiding the substrate.  Both chain loops are driven off the
same motor in synchronization, one loop going clockwise and the other
going counter clockwise, so that both loops, at the head, travel in
the same direction.  A variable speed motor drives the chain loops,
so that dwell times can be varied, and reversed if desired.  One of
the two loop legs is fixed to run in a channel in one head wall, the
other...