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Browse Prior Art Database

LAN-Based Keystroke Monitor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115502D
Original Publication Date: 1995-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jensen, BJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process that allows a user on an Operating System/2* (OS/2) LAN workstation to monitor the activity of another OS/2 workstation attached to the LAN. This process is called the LAN-Based Keystroke Monitor (LBKM).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

LAN-Based Keystroke Monitor

      Disclosed is a process that allows a user on an Operating
System/2* (OS/2) LAN workstation to monitor the activity of another
OS/2 workstation attached to the LAN.  This process is called the
LAN-Based Keystroke Monitor (LBKM).

      There is a need for LAN administrators and managers to examine
the activity of workstation users to determine the type of work being
done at a workstation, the types of applications being run, and the
productivity of a user.  LBKM is a process by which the keystrokes
occurring on a specified machine (client) on a LAN can be captured
and sent to a second machine (server) attached to the LAN.  This
function is provided through an OS/2 device driver which monitors
keystrokes entered by a user on the client machine.  In addition,
LBKM includes a control function by which the monitor function is
activated and deactivated remotely by the server workstation.

      LBKM consists of three components.  The first, the Controller,
resides on the server workstation and selects the workstation to be
monitored through input from the user.  It sends start and stop
requests to the client workstations to control the operation of the
monitor function.  It also receives keystroke data collected by the
client machines.  The second component, the Command Processor,
resides on the client workstation and receives commands from the
Controller through the LAN.  The third component, the Monitor, is a
device driver that also resides on the client machine.  It collects
keystroke data, places it into a buffer, and signals the Command

Processor to copy the data and forward it to the Controller
workstation through the LAN.

      The Controller component is a server application which presents
a screen to the user, requesting information about the operation.
Through this screen, the user selects the workstation to be
monitored, the time...