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Low-Profile Slider Attachment with Preset Pitch and Roll

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115534D
Original Publication Date: 1995-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ruiz, O: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method of attaching sliders to suspensions at any desired pitch and roll static altitude is described. Applications like passive loading require the slider to be attached at certain pitch and/or roll angle other than the traditional zero static altitude angle. A minimum possible suspension profile equal to the slider thickness is obtained as an additional advantage.

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Low-Profile Slider Attachment with Preset Pitch and Roll

      A method of attaching sliders to suspensions at any desired
pitch and roll static altitude is described.  Applications like
passive loading require the slider to be attached at certain pitch
and/or roll angle other than the traditional zero static altitude
angle.  A minimum possible suspension profile equal to the slider
thickness is obtained as an additional advantage.

      Disk files that operate with passive loading need a pitch
slider angle set to a small nonzero value before operation.  The
problem of accurately attaching the slider to the suspension with any
arbitrary pitch and roll angles is discussed here.

      Passive loading is a form of load/unload that does not require
mechanical devices to load the slider onto the disk.  No moving or
powered parts are used.  Like the load/unload concept, the idea is to
keep some separation between the disk and slider before operation and
to load the slider when the disk is spinning only and when the air
bearing is formed, thus avoiding disk-slider contact when the disk is
at rest, and wear problems are by-passed.  In passive loading the
front edge of the slider remains in contact with the disk while the
trailing edge is separated from it, thus producing a small pitch
angle of the slider with respect to the disk.  When the disk starts
spinning the different inertial flow forces produced force the
initial pitch angle to collapse, thus effectively loading the slider.
In this way passive loading is produced by the spinning disk combined
with the initial orientation of the slider.  During loading, and
depending on the type of suspension, the slider rotates a small angle
in the pitch and roll directions which produce moments that the flow
forces have to overcome.  Therefore, for the success of the device a
careful...