Browse Prior Art Database

Gesture Recognition as a Supplement to a Keyboard or Pointing Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115552D
Original Publication Date: 1995-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dordick, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a system for interacting with on-screen data via a form of virtual reality in which a user's hand gestures are represented on screen within an application in a user-defined manner.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Gesture Recognition as a Supplement to a Keyboard or Pointing Device

      Disclosed is a system for interacting with on-screen data via a
form of virtual reality in which a user's hand gestures are
represented on screen within an application in a user-defined manner.

      In its simplest implementation, two miniature video cameras
mounted in a computer, a keyboard or a nearby location would
continuously monitor the positions of the user's hands.  Because only
the outlines of the hands must be recognized -- essentially their
projection on a two-dimensional surface -- the computer vision
demands of this application would be considerably less than that of
recognizing arbitrary three-dimensional objects.

      The recognition algorithm need not distinguish between every
possible hand position.  As in voice and handwriting recognition,
variants of a particular gesture could be mapped into a single
gesture.  In addition, training would allow the algorithm to adapt to
a user's idiosyncrasies.

      The user would be able to define at the beginning of an
application or during an application the kind of on-screen function
that a particular gesture would represent.  A default interpretation
of gestures might be defined in an intuitive way, so that, for
example, moving one's finger up and down (side to side) would create
a vertical (horizontal) rule on the screen, whereas forming one's
hand into a "C"-shape would create a box.  Such a box could serve to
define a block of text, and the size of the box could be controlled
by changing the distance between one's...