Browse Prior Art Database

In-line Ion-Beam Processing of Thin-Film Disk Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115632D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crowder, MS: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is an in-situ, vacuum-based surface modification and cleaning methodology for use in thin-film disk manufacturing that has advantages over the currently employed 'wet' cleaning process. The cleaning technique employed is based upon the use of an ion-beam processing station incorporated into a thin-film disk deposition tool. In particular, two 180º opposed, 10 cm diameter, RF generated ion-beam sources were used to simultaneously treat both sides of a magnetic recording substrate. This ion-beam process chamber was attached to station #2 of a Varian 1100 disk deposition tool. NiP plated Aluminum, carbon, and glass thin-film disk substrates were treated using a variety of source gases including: argon, oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen and mixtures thereof.

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In-line Ion-Beam Processing of Thin-Film Disk Substrates

      Disclosed is an in-situ, vacuum-based surface modification and
cleaning methodology for use in thin-film disk manufacturing that has
advantages over the currently employed 'wet' cleaning process.  The
cleaning technique employed is based upon the use of an ion-beam
processing station incorporated into a thin-film disk deposition
tool.  In particular, two 180º  opposed, 10 cm diameter, RF
generated ion-beam sources were used to simultaneously treat both
sides of a magnetic recording substrate.  This ion-beam process
chamber was attached to station #2 of a Varian 1100 disk deposition
tool.  NiP plated Aluminum, carbon, and glass thin-film disk
substrates were treated using a variety of source gases including:
argon, oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen and mixtures thereof.

      NiP etch rates were measured by monitoring the weight loss of a
room temperature NiP coated Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM).
Profilometry was used to measure the etch rates of glass, and was
also used to verify the QCM determined etch rates of NiP.  The etch
rate was found to be dependent upon the ion energy, the ion flux, and
the source gas.  Using argon ions of 1000V, the etch rate for NiP was
25 Angstrom - sec(-1)  and that of glass was 10 Angstrom - sec(-1).
XPS was also used to investigate the composition of the surface after
exposure to the ion-beam.  After a 10-second exposure, the level of
carbon and oxygen contamination on the substrate surface is reduced
by an order of m...