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Browse Prior Art Database

Radio Frequency Interface Screening in Computer Subsystems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115681D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cutts, S: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In computer subsystems for housing a number of system components screening for Radio Frequency Interface (RFI) presents a problem. For example, for disk files the current design of subsystem typically uses an RFI metal screen/door to suppress file radiation. This screen is unsightly, costly and gives users a poor impression of product quality. The door usually consists of a plated steel part combined with RFI gasket hence the door looks unsightly. The RFI door covers the front and rear of the subsystem metal chassis to effect the RFI suppression.

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Radio Frequency Interface Screening in Computer Subsystems

      In computer subsystems for housing a number of system
components screening for Radio Frequency Interface (RFI) presents a
problem.  For example, for disk files the current design of subsystem
typically uses an RFI metal screen/door to suppress file radiation.
This screen is unsightly, costly and gives users a poor impression of
product quality.  The door usually consists of a plated steel part
combined with RFI gasket hence the door looks unsightly.  The RFI
door covers the front and rear of the subsystem metal chassis to
effect the RFI suppression.

      The problem is addressed by the provision of a common plastic
carrier.  The common carrier consists of a plastic enclosure which is
electroless plated nickel over copper to provide an effective screen.
When a group of carriers, typically 8, are inserted into a metal
chassis an RFI screen is created from carrier to carrier by moulded
and plated flexures on the top, bottom and sides of the carrier
touching neighbouring carriers and chassis metalwork.  Having
achieved an effective screen the need for an RFI door is eliminated.
The appearance of the subsystem is much enhanced together with the
ergonomics of the carrier.  The flexures or plastic springs are
moulded as part of the carrier enclosure mouldings and plated as
described.  The moulding and plating of the flexures makes the RFI
function cheap and effective.