Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Retrieving DOS and WIN-OS/2 Settings of Network Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115731D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Callaway, JR: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for retrieving the DOS and WIN-OS/2* settings of network applications. In some network operating systems, a user logging on to a domain can have network applications added to his desktop. Each of these applications are represented as program reference objects in the Network Applications folder. Each program reference object points to the real program file object which resides on a remote server. DOS and Windows applications have attributes such as DOS and WIN-OS/2 settings stored in the extended attributes of the program file. When OS/2 creates a program reference object, it uses the default DOS and WIN-OS/2 settings; it does not retrieve the actual settings information from the program file object residing on the remote server.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Retrieving DOS and WIN-OS/2 Settings of Network Applications

      Disclosed is a method for retrieving the DOS and WIN-OS/2*
settings of network applications.  In some network operating systems,
a user logging on to a domain can have network applications added to
his desktop.  Each of these applications are represented as program
reference objects in the Network Applications folder.  Each program
reference object points to the real program file object which resides
on a remote server.  DOS and Windows applications have attributes
such as DOS and WIN-OS/2 settings stored in the extended attributes
of the program file.  When OS/2 creates a program reference object,
it uses the default DOS and WIN-OS/2 settings; it does not retrieve
the actual settings information from the program file object residing
on the remote server.  There is no mechanism to change the DOS and
WIN-OS/2 settings of a DOS or Windows application residing on a
remote server and have them reflected at all the remote workstations.
Currently, the LAN administrator has to inform users at client
workstations to change these settings each time they log on to the
domain.

      When a user logs on to a domain, the logon program retrieves
the list of network applications assigned to that user from the
Domain Control Database (DCDB) stored on the domain.  The logon
program then creates the Network Applications folder on the user's
desktop and populates the folder with program reference objects
c...