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Electrical Characterization of Carbon Overcoat

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115751D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brown, BR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Carbon overcoat has been used extensively on both disks and heads to enhance the tribological properties of head/disk interfaces. Their structural properties are usually monitored using Raman Spectroscopy and their mechanical properties are evaluated with pin-on disks, Contact Start and Stop (CSS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and others. Described is a simple yet effective technique to characterize the overcoat, present resistivity and electrical breakdown data and propose the underlying mechanisms of these electric properties.

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Electrical Characterization of Carbon Overcoat

      Carbon overcoat has been used extensively on both disks and
heads to enhance the tribological properties of head/disk interfaces.
Their structural properties are usually monitored using Raman
Spectroscopy and their mechanical properties are evaluated with
pin-on disks, Contact Start and Stop (CSS), Atomic Force Microscopy
(AFM) and others.  Described is a simple yet effective technique to
characterize the overcoat, present resistivity and electrical
breakdown data and propose the underlying mechanisms of these
electric properties.

      Traditionally, electric properties of insulator films are
measured by evaporating/sputtering electrodes on them.  Since this
method is awkward and laborious for overcoats of heads/disks, we have
developed a simple technique, whereby a gold plated pin was pressed
on the overcoat of either head or disk to make a reliable electrical
contact.  The computer-controlled voltage-current (V-I) setup is
shown in Fig. 1, where typically, about a 15 gram load is applied to
a pin with an approximate 50 to 100 mm contact diameter.  In order to
ensure that the measured V-I characteristics of these overcoats,
ranging from 100 to 250 angstrom in thickness, not to be muddled with
the presence of pin holes, measurements are repeated many times to
validate the data integrity.  This is shown in Fig. 2, where less
than 2% current variation is seen when the applied voltage is ramped
up and down for...