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Chemical Modification of Thin-Film Magnetic Recording Disk Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115781D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crowder, MS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

High-density, thin-film magnetic recording disks typically employ a metallic underlayer film. The purpose of this underlayer is to enhance the preferential grain growth of the magnetic alloy which, in turn, leads to enhanced magnetic performance of the thin-film disk. In the present work, we present an alternative to the use of a metallic underlayer to obtain magnetic performance, i.e., we disclose a process by which the magnetic performance can be controlled by chemically modifying the NiP plated substrate. Since uncontrolled contamination of the surface by atmospheric contamination is unavoidable, the chemical modification processing would preferentially be carried out in-vacuo, in a disk deposition tool using either an ion beam, plasma, UV or other excitation source.

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Chemical Modification of Thin-Film Magnetic Recording Disk Substrates

      High-density, thin-film magnetic recording disks typically
employ a metallic underlayer film.  The purpose of this underlayer is
to enhance the preferential grain growth of the magnetic alloy which,
in turn, leads to enhanced magnetic performance of the thin-film
disk.  In the present work, we present an alternative to the use of a
metallic underlayer to obtain magnetic performance, i.e., we disclose
a process by which the magnetic performance can be controlled by
chemically modifying the NiP plated substrate.  Since uncontrolled
contamination of the surface by atmospheric contamination is
unavoidable, the chemical modification processing would
preferentially
be carried out in-vacuo, in a disk deposition tool using either an
ion
beam, plasma, UV or other excitation source.  In what follows, we
focus
on the use of an ion beam based surface modification.

      For the purpose of demonstration, an ion beam process chamber
was attached to station #2 of a Varian 1100 disk deposition tool set
up to process 65 mm dia.  NiP plated Al/Mg thin -film disk subtrates.
In these experiments, the NiP substrates were treated with 700 V ions
created from gas mixtures of varying composition of Argon and Oxygen.
Immediately following the ion beam surface treatment, a magnetic film
was sputtered onto the chemically modified NiP surface, and this was
followed by deposition of a protective carbon overcoat. ...