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Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Audio Multiplexing and Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115790D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 4 page(s) / 107K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Padgett, RS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for multiplexing and controlling audio messages in a multi-function personal communicator. The way in which a transmission takes place is determined by whether the device is connected to a cable, with the default condition being the personal communicator unattached, operating over a cellular network.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Audio Multiplexing and Control

      Disclosed is a method for multiplexing and controlling audio
messages in a multi-function personal communicator.  The way in which
a transmission takes place is determined by whether the device is
connected to a cable, with the default condition being the personal
communicator unattached, operating over a cellular network.

      Fig. 1 is an isometric view of the personal communicator 10 in
an exploded relationship with the attachment devices allowing it to
communicate over the public telephone network.  These devices consist
of a an RJ11 cable 12 having a 33-pin connector 13 for attachment to
the personal communicator 10, a Data Access Arrangement (DAA) 14
allowing direct attachment of the RJ11 cable to the telephone system,
and a telephone cord 15 plugging into a standard telephone wall jack
16.

      Fig. 2 is a schematic view of an audio multiplexor control
circuit within the personal communicator 10.  Through this circuit,
an output signal is directed to either the RJ11 cable 12 for
transmission over the public (wired) telephone network, or to a Radio
Frequency (RF) deck for transmission over a cellular network.

      To place a call over the cellular telephone network, the user
dials the desired phone number on a touch screen interface 17 of the
personal communicator 10, with cable 12 unattached.  Software running
within the communicator 10 loads register 18 through microprocessor
data bus 19 with the binary number '001000.'  (Bit 1 is the most
significant bit.)  Since Bit 3 is high, gate 29 is turned on, gating
Speaker/Microphone line 30 to line 32, extending to an RF-deck (not
shown) for cellular transmission.  Since all of the other bits in
register 18 are low, all of the other gates are shut down.

      To place a call over the public telephone network, the user
dials the desired phone number on touch screen interface 17, with the
communicator 10 attached to a wall jack 16 using the devices of Fig.
1.
Software running within the communicator 10, determining that
cable 12 is attached, loads register 18 with the binary number
'000100.'  Since Bit 4 is now high, gate 33 is turned on, gating
Speaker/Microphone line 30 to an output line 34 in the RJ11 cable 1...