Browse Prior Art Database

Quantitative Surface Topography and Micro Curvature Analysis using White Light Interference Contrast Microscopy

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115808D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crump, DS: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a system for quantifying both micro and macro surface morphologies using a unique combination of polarized Differential Interference Contrast white light applications, coupled with photometrically generated FFTA processed signals.

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Quantitative Surface Topography and Micro Curvature Analysis using
White Light Interference Contrast Microscopy

      Disclosed is a system for quantifying both micro and macro
surface morphologies using a unique combination of polarized
Differential Interference Contrast white light applications, coupled
with photometrically generated FFTA processed signals.

      Advantages of this technique over stylus or laser
interferometry based systems, are age measurement versatility and
simplicity of signal detection.

      The analytical technique is based on a unique interactive
system of using polarized white light differential interference
contrast microscopy, selectable optical attenuators, photomultipliers
for signal generation, and customized FFT analysis.

      The sample is imaged through optical microscopy to
preferentially highlight the surface topography of interest.  As the
surface is dynamically scanned, minute changes in surface morphology
are transmitted to the signal processor through a predetermined
aperture configuration located at the exit focal plane and
photomultiplier interface.

      The image is produced by transmitting polarizing white light
through a Walliston prism, splitting the light into two separate
phase equal beams (reference and specimen).  As the slope of the
specimen surface changes, a phase change difference is created
between the two reflected light beams (1,2).  The amplitude of the
phase change corresponds directly...