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Single Centralized Crash Stop for Disk Drive Rotary Actuatory

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115829D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Albrecht, D: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A low cost single crash stop system for a rotary actuator in a hard disk drive is disclosed that replaces the two independent inner and outer diameter crash stops that are traditionally used. These crashstops are used to provide a known position for servo initialization, calibration, and parking as well as provide a stop to prevent damage to the head/suspension assembly in the event servo control is lost.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 93% of the total text.

Single Centralized Crash Stop for Disk Drive Rotary Actuatory

      A low cost single crash stop system for a rotary actuator in a
hard disk drive is disclosed that replaces the two independent inner
and outer diameter crash stops that are traditionally used.  These
crashstops are used to provide a known position for servo
initialization, calibration, and parking as well as provide a stop to
prevent damage to the head/suspension assembly in the event servo
control is lost.

      Two embodiments for the single crash stop are shown in Figs. 1
and 2.  The first uses a simple "O" ring on a post that is located
precisely with respect to the actuator pivot post and spindle
centerline.  Similarly,  close tolerances are maintained on the
actuator assembly as the inside of the coil is wound on a precision
mandel.  Using the appropriate tooling, the coil can be located
accurately on the actuator with respect to the pivot and head
suspension swage hole.  In many actuator assemblies, the coil is
wound on a bobbin that is in turn mounted to the actuator, or the
coil is molded in plastic directly to the actuator carriage.  In
these configurations, an internal slot would be molded in the coil
bobbin area with the ends of that slot the principle surfaces that
are aligned to the rest of the actuator.

      The second embodiment shown in Fig. 2 uses a twin leaf spring
located in a slotted post.  The ends of the spring act on surfaces
molded on the inside of the coil as...