Browse Prior Art Database

Voice-Activated Kitchen Assistant

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115833D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 4 page(s) / 142K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cohen, PS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a computing device configured especially for an application in the family kitchen environment. Preferably, the kitchen assistant is a microprocessor-based system, with memory and storage, running a continuous-speech, speaker-independent speech recognition system, such as ICCS (the IBM* Continuous Speech Series), using a very-constrained vocabulary with an average perplexity of four to six and a maximum perplexity of twelve to fourteen [1,2].

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Voice-Activated Kitchen Assistant

      Disclosed is a computing device configured especially for an
application in the family kitchen environment.  Preferably, the
kitchen assistant is a microprocessor-based system, with memory and
storage, running a continuous-speech, speaker-independent speech
recognition system, such as ICCS (the IBM* Continuous Speech Series),
using a very-constrained vocabulary with an average perplexity of
four to six and a maximum perplexity of twelve to fourteen [1,2].

      Fig. 1 is an isometric view of the kitchen assistant 1, which
includes a microphone 2 and a speaker 3.  A touch-to-talk feature,
activated by depressing a button 4, allows the user to interrupt the
device and establishes the beginning and end of verbal responses,
minimizing recognition errors caused by background noise.  A first
flat panel 5 displays images and recipes, while a second flat panel 6
displays verbal prompts and commands associated with the use of the
speech recognition system.  The functions assigned to panels 5 and 6
may alternately be assigned to left and right sections of a larger
panel.  The kitchen assistant 1 also includes a compact disk player
(not shown), loading multimedia menu-based application software to
form an especially adaptive cookbook.  Certain questions asked of the
user by the device may be answered by depressing a "yes" button 7 or
a "no" button 8.  The audio volume of the device may be adjusted
using a knob 9, and a directional microphone 10 may also be used to
input information.

      The software cookbook includes pictures, ingredients, and
recipes, together with a list of questions and commands active for
each recipe.  This list includes several dozen questions making up
the bulk of the questions a cook might ask about the recipe.  The
phonetic strings, baseforms, Backus-Naur Forms, BNFs Fbgrammars,
n-grams, or other linguistic or acoustic data for these questions is
shipped as a part of the software, and appropriate contexts are
activated when a user selects a specific recipe.  When the user asks
a specific question, the sound bytes, images, and text required to
answer that question are retrieved and presented to the user.  The
optional addition of a printed cookbook, with active questions beside
each recipe, allows the kitchen assistant to be used from a
speaker-phone or portable phone, without a display in the kitchen.

      Fig. 2 is a flow chart showing a typical interaction which
occurs after the user turns on the kitchen assistant 1.  With the
question of step 12, the user is preferably prompted to answer in a
redundant fashion, saying "Yes, I have found one," or "No, I haven't
found one."  This redundancy reduces the likelihood of a recognition
error in a noisy environment.  In step 14, the user is asked to
respond with a page number to avoid the ambiguity and perplexity of
many recipe names.  After the selection is made, the kitchen
assistant can respond by...