Browse Prior Art Database

Nano-Tube Field Emitter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115857D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fink, HW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Field emitter as electron sources are employed in modern high performance electron microscopes, Scanning Electron Microscopes, electron beam writing for lithography purposes and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Electron holography an novel electron microscopy schemes like the Low Energy Electron Point Source (LEEPS) Microscope, where brightness and coherence of the resulting electron beam is of particular importance also use electron field emitters.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 77% of the total text.

Nano-Tube Field Emitter

      Field emitter as electron sources are employed in modern high
performance electron microscopes, Scanning Electron Microscopes,
electron beam writing for lithography purposes and Transmission
Electron Microscopy (TEM).  Electron holography an novel electron
microscopy schemes like the Low Energy Electron Point Source (LEEPS)
Microscope, where brightness and coherence of the resulting electron
beam is of particular importance also use electron field emitters.

      Described is a source for electrons which is characterized in
that not a tungsten tip serves as electron emitter but a carbon
nano-tube mounted to a tungsten tip.  Nano-tubes range from one to
several nanometer in diameter; their walls can be just one carbon
atomic layer carbon thick.  A single nano-tube is employde as a field
emitter to achieve a bright nanometer sized, inert source for low
energy electrons for use in lens-less holography (one of the LEEPS
applications) as well as in other types of electron microscopes.

      To produce such a source we use the following technique to
mount a single nano-tube and handle it as a usable electron source:
the nano-tubes are deposited onto a perforated carbon film sample
that is subsequently imaged with the LEEPS microscope.  An additional
tip mounted onto a standard electron source holder, is brought into
the field of view of the microscope to make contact to a selected
nano-tube.  Once contact is achieved, the potential...