Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Implementing a Network Interface as an Icon on the Windows Desktop

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115862D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cheok, CK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for implementing a network interface as an icon on the Microsoft Windows* desktop, without compromising the Windows WINNET specification, giving the user quicker access to network-related functions.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Implementing a Network Interface as an Icon on the Windows
Desktop

      Disclosed is a method for implementing a network interface as
an icon on the Microsoft Windows* desktop, without compromising the
Windows WINNET specification, giving the user quicker access to
network-related functions.

      The Windows specification for network driver development,
referred to as the WINNET specification, emphasizes integration into
published Windows 3.x entry points.  These entry points can be found
in the File Manager, Print Manager, and Control Panel, and include
such functions as connecting to network drives and network printers
and managing print jobs on remote queues.

      The WINNET specification provides developers of Windows network
drivers a method to integrate their network interface with Windows.
This can be appealing to users who want to perform their network
tasks within File Manager and Print Manager.  However,
implementations that follow strict adherence to the WINNET
specification may require the user to traverse excessive numbers of
panels in order to perform a specific network task, such as
connecting to a network drive.

      By providing a "front-end" program to the network driver, the
limitations of the current WINNET specification are overcome without
compromising it.  This method is based on the inclusion of a program,
WNET.EXE, which acts as a front-end to the Windows network driver
that is installed.  For example, in OS/2** LAN Server 4.0, the
network driver for the Windows client is DLSNET.DRV.  The front-end
program, renamed WDLS.EXE, makes WINNET API and LAN Server API calls
into the network driver, which interfaces with the installed network
services, such as the redirector, messenger, and peer.

      The WNET.EXE program presents a Graphical User Interface (GUI)
to the user, with a...