Browse Prior Art Database

Strategy for Propagating Response Files in a Network Installation Plan Object

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115884D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 4 page(s) / 141K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bunce, JL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a design for generating instance response files when a network administrator edits response files and propagates the resulting generated file objects throughout an administrator-defined install plan. The burdens on network administrators have been rapidly growing both in volume and in complexity. Chief among them is the need for administrators to easily plan and execute the installation and configuration of software products on a group of workstations on a LAN. This strategy for generating and propagating response files throughout an install plan object can be used with any network planning, installation, and configuration program.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 39% of the total text.

Strategy for Propagating Response Files in a Network Installation
Plan Object

      Disclosed is a design for generating instance response files
when a network administrator edits response files and propagates the
resulting generated file objects throughout an administrator-defined
install plan.  The burdens on network administrators have been
rapidly growing both in volume and in complexity.  Chief among them
is the need for administrators to easily plan and execute the
installation and configuration of software products on a group of
workstations on a LAN.  This strategy for generating and propagating
response files throughout an install plan object can be used with any
network planning, installation, and configuration program.

      A network installation program would consist of a top level
plan object that can have one or more application-in-plan objects and
one group-in-plan object.  This plan object would represent the
applications that will be installed or configured on a group of
workstations.  An application-in-plan object could have a
category-in-plan object which represents the action of the
application-in-plan, such as install, configure, or remove.

      A group-in-plan could have one or more workstations-in-plan,
and a workstation-in-plan will have as many
workstation-application-in-plan objects as there are
application-in-plan objects.  For example, if OS/2 Warp* and LAN
Server* were application-in-plan objects, each workstation-in-plan
object would have corresponding OS/2 Warp and LAN Server
workstation-application-in-plan objects.  This division allows
administrators to view and modify applications either at a
workstation or a plan (or group) level.

      A workstation-application-in-plan object could also have a
category-in-plan object.  Whether a category-in-plan resides under an
application-in-plan or workstation-application-in-plan object, a
category-in-plan object can have a response file object.  A response
file is an ASCII file that allows administrators to specify keywords
and values to provide to an installation or configuration program in
lieu of an administrator needing to enter these values at the target
workstation.

      In a network installation program, response file objects could
reside at two states which reflect actions that an administrator has
performed on the object:
  1.  Class - A class response file is essentially a model response
       file that the administrator has not modified.  When a copy of
an
       application is taken from the applications container and added
to
       an install plan, the default response file belonging to the
       category that matches the application's action will be copied
as
       a class response file to the application-in-plan object that
was
       added to the plan.  Administrators can later add or replace
       response files in a plan by dragging and dropping response
file
   ...