Browse Prior Art Database

Computer-Supported Audio Communication

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115910D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Griesshaber, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique for a computer supported audio communication between two or more computer in a heterogeneous distributed environment by using special algorithms for network communications and processing of audio data.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 59% of the total text.

Computer-Supported Audio Communication

      Disclosed is a technique for a computer supported audio
communication between two or more computer in a heterogeneous
distributed environment by using special algorithms for network
communications and processing of audio data.

      In today's multimedia technology it is possible to process
digital audio in various ways.  The computers are equipped with audio
technology, mostly adapter cards, which allows to connect different
conventional audio devices for input and output like microphones and
speakers.  This technology allows computers to support recording and
playback of human voice or other audio data like music.

      In the area of data communication many computers are
interconnected with digital networks like the Internet, Local Area
Networks or ISDN.  Thereby, it is possible to exchange digital data
between two or more computers.

      These two facts, the multimedia technology and the
communication technology, make the computer supported audio
communication possible.  Digital audio has the peculiarity to be a
continuous media, which has a strong real time requirement.  To
weaken
this requirement, special algorithms are necessary, because today's
communication networks normally don't support guaranteed transmission
and other bottlenecks like weak processors exist.  The main problem
is that the audio data could be transmitted from the source to the
sink to slow or to fast, therefore not continuous. ...