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External Wire Reduction for Linear Electrostatic Actuator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115914D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fan, L: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is the method and configuration to reduce the wiring of an electrostatic actuator/sensor system to the minimum number by introducing integrated switch and superimpose the sensing signal in the frequency domain. Miniaturized linear electrostatic actuator has been disclosed. This type of device has three external connections for its operation: a common ground and two signal lines. Since wiring is an expensive process, it is desirable to reduce the number of external connections to an electronic device. This disclosure presents an integrated switch design which results in a device with only one signal wire and a ground which could be common to the suspension.

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External Wire Reduction for Linear Electrostatic Actuator

      Disclosed is the method and configuration to reduce the wiring
of an electrostatic actuator/sensor system to the minimum number by
introducing integrated switch and superimpose the sensing signal in
the frequency domain.  Miniaturized linear electrostatic actuator has
been disclosed.  This type of device has three external connections
for its operation: a common ground and two signal lines.  Since
wiring is an expensive process, it is desirable to reduce the number
of external connections to an electronic device.  This disclosure
presents an integrated switch design which results in a device with
only one signal wire and a ground which could be common to the
suspension.

      The electrostatic actuator relies on the electrostatic force
between one of the two static electrodes and the free standing plate
for its operation.  The electrostatic charge between these plates
establishes the electrostatic force and an external voltage source
supplies the charge through connecting wires.  Regardless the
polarity of charge, the resulting electrostatic force is always
attractive.  Therefore the external voltage source can be either
positive or negative.  Based on these characteristics, we designed
the electronic switching circuits shown in the box of Fig. 1 for
driving the electrostatic actuator.  The entire circuit is to be
fabricated on the same wafer with the actuator.  The resulting device
has two external connections: signal and ground, one less than the
original design.  When the signal line is positive with respect to
ground, rectifier D1 conducts, electrode 1 is charged and the
actuator is attracted toward it.  Similarly, when the signal line is
negative, electrode 2 is charged through rectifier D2 and the
actuator moves in the ot...