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Browse Prior Art Database

Monitor for Voice Response Unit Traffic

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115923D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Butler, N: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A number of reasons can be advanced for the monitoring of traffic through a Voice Response Unit (VRU): 1. Security - Many banks and financial institutions have a requirement to record all transactions made over the telephone for audio purposes, to prove that certain events were made to happen at specific times. 2. Recording in-bound for diagnosing line problems - It is often the case on VRU systems that a specific installation has a problem on the line which connects it to a PTT network. For example, echo on the line caused by a local "channel bank", DTMF tones generated by the local PBX which do not conform with the line specification, cracks, whistles, side-tones, pops, signal attenuation, or high levels of background noise at the remote end of the connection.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Monitor for Voice Response Unit Traffic

      A number of reasons can be advanced for the monitoring of
traffic through a Voice Response Unit (VRU):
  1.  Security - Many banks and financial institutions have a
       requirement to record all transactions made over the telephone
       for audio purposes, to prove that certain events were made to
       happen at specific times.
  2.  Recording in-bound for diagnosing line problems - It is often
the
       case on VRU systems that a specific installation has a problem
on
       the line which connects it to a PTT network.
    For example, echo on the line caused by a local "channel
   bank", DTMF tones generated by the local PBX which do not conform
   with the line specification, cracks, whistles, side-tones, pops,
   signal attenuation, or high levels of background noise at the
   remote end of the connection.
    All such line problems may have unexpected detrimental
   effects on the operation of the VRU.
  3.  Problem determination of VRU filters - VRU systems VRU systems
       typically have DTMF and tone-detectors which take the in-bound
       signal and process it looking for various "patterns" which
fall
       into certain specified parameters.
    Such systems often fail to detect such patterns in the
   in-bound audio signal due to line problems (see above).
    Such systems can also give "false detections" where a
   pattern is detected when a similar, but different pattern is
   actually present on the in-bound audio stream.  For example:
   "talk-off" is a common problem for DTMF tone detection algorithms.
  4.  Recording DTMF tones - VRU systems do not allow applications to
       record VRU tones.  These tones are very loud, and distort the
dB
       recording levels of segments in which they are recorded.  As a
       result, VRU system will typically "cut-out" these tone
patterns.
      o  For testing purposes, usually automated testcase
development,
          it is often helpful to be able to play strings of these
dtmf
          segments from one end of a VRU-to-VRU based "back-to-back"
          test system.  Maybe to test some function in the other VRU.
      o  For example, when one VRU is set up to "drive" the other VRU
        ...