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Plating Bath for the Electrodeposition of Nickel Ferrous Chromium Ternary Alloy

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116004D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 89K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Croll, IM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a simple plating bath formulation for the deposition of the NiFeCr ternary alloy and other chrome-containing metal alloys. Compared to previously reported attempts at developing a bath for the deposition of NiFeCr, this bath (1) achieves metallic deposits with high Cr content (app 10 wt%), (2), allows deposition with high current efficiency (to 50%), and (3), allows deposition of metallic deposits over a broad range of current densities (to 40 mA/cmsup2). This plating bath formulation is also capable of plating NiFe (permalloy) and NiFeCr (Crpermalloy) from the same bath by varying the current density, as well as producing laminated films of NiFe and NiFeCr from the same bath. The bath is extendable to other Cr-containing alloy systems.

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Plating Bath for the Electrodeposition of Nickel Ferrous Chromium
Ternary Alloy

      Disclosed is a simple plating bath formulation for the
deposition of the NiFeCr ternary alloy and other chrome-containing
metal alloys.  Compared to previously reported attempts at developing
a bath for the deposition of NiFeCr, this bath (1) achieves metallic
deposits with high Cr content (app 10 wt%), (2), allows deposition
with high current efficiency (to 50%), and (3), allows deposition of
metallic deposits over a broad range of current densities (to 40
mA/cmsup2).  This plating bath formulation is also capable of plating
NiFe (permalloy) and NiFeCr (Crpermalloy) from the same bath by
varying the current density, as well as producing laminated films of
NiFe and NiFeCr from the same bath.  The bath is extendable to other
Cr-containing alloy systems.  Disclosed also is the use of acetic as
a plating bath additive that results in the superior bath properties
described above.

      Methods of deposition of NiFeCr include sputter deposition and
electrodeposition.  Electrodeposition is the generally preferred
method because of the high rates attainable and the low capital
investment.  The difficulty in electrodepositing Cr alloys is that
chromium hydroxide species precipitate at the electrode surface at
conditions under which most other metals are deposited.
Electrodeposition from a standard permalloy plating bath (1),
modified with the addition of CrClsub3 salt yields no deposit at 5 or
20 mA/cmsub2.  Other baths reported in the literature include one by
(2), which was quite complex compared to the standard permalloy
plating bath, and a much simpler one described by (3), who were able
to produce alloys with up to 10wt% Cr.  Both of these baths are
limited in the range of current densities that produce smooth
metallic
deposits, and provide very low current efficiencies (to 36%).

      The plating bath disclosed here is a simple modification of the
Watts-type permalloy bath typically used for nickle-iron
electrodeposition.  The addition of the  additives chromium chloride
and acetic acid to the permalloy bath produces ...