Browse Prior Art Database

Pointing Device for Visually Handicapped Users

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116026D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 4 page(s) / 233K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kanayama, K: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a device that can determine the current location of the pointer on a display from differences in the pitch and rapidity of tones. The purpose of this device is to make it easier for visually handicapped people to use computer window systems (Fig. 1).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 86% of the total text.

Pointing Device for Visually Handicapped Users

      Disclosed is a device that can determine the current location
of the pointer on a display from differences in the pitch and
rapidity of tones.  The purpose of this device is to make it easier
for visually handicapped people to use computer window systems (Fig.
1).

      The intermittent sounds represent the current location of the
pointer on a two-dimensional plane, in this case, a screen window.  A
certain range of rapidity of beeping is mapped onto the x axis, and
the pitch of the sound is mapped onto the y axis.  If there is only
one window, the coordinates are equivalently mapped onto that window.
If there is more than one window, each window has its own sound
coordinates, and the root window also has its own coordinates.  In
this case, the device automatically switches the sound coordinates
according to the movement of the pointer, and makes the appropriate
sound for the current window (Fig. 2).

      As an extension of this basic function, the device can read
aloud the name of the application running in the window currently
being pointed to.  By reading aloud the names of various kinds of
event
such as pushing a mouse button, dragging, and dropping, the device
can also allow the user to determine the direction in which the
window is being moved, the amount by which it is being resized,
and so on (Fig. 3).  The invention can also be applied to push
buttons and tool boxes, as well as windows, to he...