Browse Prior Art Database

Radial Scale Object

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116049D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 4 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Amro, HY: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is an object that can be added to the existing library of objects available from within modern Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) systems and programmed into modern operating system shells and Graphical User Interface (GUI).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Radial Scale Object

      Disclosed is an object that can be added to the existing
library of objects available from within modern Computer Aided
Software Engineering (CASE) systems and programmed into modern
operating system shells and Graphical User Interface (GUI).

      Objects are programmed into modern operating system shells like
OS/2*, Windows**, desktops based on MOTIF, and others.

      Such objects are, usually, incorporated into CASE system that
facilitate the construction of GUI operating environments.  Examples
of these objects include Push Buttons, Scroll Bars, Scales, Spin
Buttons and many others.

      The existing Scale object is in the form of a slide (Fig. 1).
The mouse is used in order to alter the position of the Scales' arm,
which in turn, alters the magnitude registered by the Scale object.
The Scale can be oriented vertically or horizontally.

There exists problems with such an arrangement:
  1.  The Scale, in either orientation, consumes real-estate in
either
       the vertical or the horizontally direction, which, at times,
       interferes with the arrangement of other objects when sharing
the
       same layout or "window".
  2.  To get an accurate representation of the relative magnitude
being
       measured by the Scale.  The size of the Scale object needs to
be
       increased in size in the direction in which it is laid out.
That
       aggravate the Problem in #1.
  3.  Analog dials have dominated the human interface since the start
       of the industrial revolution.  Humans find analog dials
intuitive
       and easy to read with only a glance.  The present Scale object
       violates that premise.

      This proposed Radial Scale Object, as seen in Fig. 2, is in the
shape of a dial with the four quarters clearly marked.  A permanent
Reference Arm marks the origin.  When in use, a Sweeping Arm marks
the relative quantity being measured.

      The Sweeping Arm will sweep clockwise for positive magnitudes
and counter clockwise for negative magnitudes.  The area swept by the
Sweeping Arm in the positive direction will be filled with a color
that is different from that used to fill the negative swept area.
Example; if the positive swept area is colored red then the negative
swept area will be colored using a color...