Browse Prior Art Database

Command-Sensitive Parsing in an Editor Shell View

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116061D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baker, BR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The command-sensitive parsing mechanism disclosed builds upon, and expands, the live parsing capabilities of an editor in its commands shell view. It provides the user with an enhanced visual feedback of the shell session output that consists of information highlighted and accessible in various manners according to the particular command, and with other features traditionally available in language-sensitive editing. The user may customize and extend the functionality for additional, and custom, shell-runnable system commands.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Command-Sensitive Parsing in an Editor Shell View

      The command-sensitive parsing mechanism disclosed builds upon,
and expands, the live parsing capabilities of an editor in its
commands shell view.  It provides the user with an enhanced visual
feedback of the shell session output that consists of information
highlighted and accessible in various manners according to the
particular command, and with other features traditionally available
in language-sensitive editing.  The user may customize and extend the
functionality for additional, and custom, shell-runnable system
commands.

      A shell (main) parser monitors the editor shell activity
(invocation of commands, and the output from these commands), and
interacts with the appropriate command subparsers (secondary parsers)
that are attached to it.  The shell parser is invoked when a shell
view is opened in the editor.  It initializes the shell view actions
and menus, defines in the editor the PROMPT class and four additional
classes to serve as the command id in combination (SHELLID1 -
SHELLID4), starts the CMD.EXE processor, and the two-way
communication with it.  The classes in the editor are a set of named
bits that can be set in any combination for each element (line) in a
file.  The subparsers, or other editor utilities, may define and use
additional classes in addition to the ones initially set by the shell
parser.  The editor can scope certain operations to work on lines
that belong to a particular class or set of classes.

      The shell parser uses a subparsers profile table SHELL.DAT, a
flat file that is read in upon initialization, that identifies:
  o  the system commands supported (their names, abbreviations,
      synonyms, etc.)
  o  the command id for each (1 - 16)
  o  the particular subparser (.DLL) to use
  o  the type of parsing for the initial run of the command
      (I = incremental, F = full parse).

      A typical table is shown below.  The user may add commands and
subparsers to be supported by the shell, through a registration
mechanism or by editing SHELL.DAT directly.
     *
     * Editor commands shell
     *
     1 DIR,D LXSHLDIR I
     2 CL,CC LXSHLMFO F

      The subparsers adhere to an application programming interface
that allows for a smooth interaction with the shell parser.

      The shell parser sets the PROMPT class for every line in the
shell view that contains the system prompt.  I...