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Browse Prior Art Database

Interchanging State Table Actions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116092D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Evans, BA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A number of computer applications, particularly those involving interfacing with external networks, use a Syntatic Language to identify specific actions to the applications. For example, the application DirectTalk/6000* has a State Table Editor which is a GUI X-Windows/Motif application for generating voice applications. The State Table consists of a list of actions which define how a voice application should progress (Answer, play voice, listen for Dual-Tone Multifrequency (DTMF), request external data, etc.) Because of their complexity, these actions cannot easily be copied from one state table to another. Certain action parameters may become invalid outside of the original state table (label references and variables may not be locally defined).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 78% of the total text.

Interchanging State Table Actions

      A number of computer applications, particularly those involving
interfacing with external networks, use a Syntatic Language to
identify specific actions to the applications.  For example, the
application DirectTalk/6000* has a State Table Editor which is a GUI
X-Windows/Motif application for generating voice applications.  The
State Table consists of a list of actions which define how a voice
application should progress (Answer, play voice, listen for Dual-Tone
Multifrequency (DTMF), request external data, etc.)  Because of their
complexity, these actions cannot easily be copied from one state
table to another.  Certain action parameters may become invalid
outside of the original state table (label references and variables
may not be locally defined).

      To enable the interchange of these actions between different
state tables (possibly on different machines), a standard interface
language had to be used so that these actions could be passed to the
clipboard and understood when read at the other end.

      Instead of generating a new pseudo binary language it was
thought better to translate these actions to an ASCII standard which
could be used to rebuild them at the other end.  Some work had
already been done in defining an ASCII way to generate these state
table actions so this was extended to allow the actions to be
transformed back to the ASCII standard.

      The same procedures could be used for export...