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Browse Prior Art Database

Integral Door and Earthquake Brace

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116094D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Feinstein Jr, P: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is an integral door/brace assembly which provides the sway bracing required for rack mounted computers and electronic products to survive earthquakes. Typical rack machines are supplied with a rear access door which provides no structural support to the rack. This invention consists of a modified door assembly, which is sufficiently rigid to reinforce the rack against sway in the side-to-side direction.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 56% of the total text.

Integral Door and Earthquake Brace

      Disclosed is an integral door/brace assembly which provides the
sway bracing required for rack mounted computers and electronic
products to survive earthquakes.  Typical rack machines are supplied
with a rear access door which provides no structural support to the
rack.  This invention consists of a modified door assembly, which is
sufficiently rigid to reinforce the rack against sway in the
side-to-side direction.

      In order for the door to successfully reinforce the rack
structure, it must be attached securely to the rack at several
locations when closed.  This may be accomplished by providing one or
more mechanical latches on the unhinged side of the door.  These
latches must interlock with the frame and prevent relative motion
between the door and the rack in all directions.  In addition, the
door hinges themselves may provide a sufficiently rigid attachment on
the other side of the door.  Both hinges and latches will normally
require substantial reinforcement as compared to the usual design, as
each must typically withstand several thousand pounds force without
significant flexure or mechanical failure.

      An alternative and preferred embodiment is to provide passive
interlocks at each of the four corners of the door.  These interlocks
are intended to bear the entire resistive force between the door and
the rack, so as to relieve any hinges or latches of high forces.
Fig. 1 shows a door structure whic...