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Manufacture of Print Circuit Boards using Suspended Conductive Material Bonded by Heat

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116112D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McMorran, JJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique for generating a conductive path in a material without having to use a subtractive process. The technique also permits creation of multilayer raw cards without the need to drill holes.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Manufacture of Print Circuit Boards using Suspended Conductive Material
Bonded by Heat

      Disclosed is a technique for generating a conductive path in a
material without having to use a subtractive process.  The technique
also permits creation of multilayer raw cards without the need to
drill holes.

      Conventional printed circuit boards are normally created by
etching a copper clad laminate to create lines of copper which are
used as the conductive tracks.  Insulation from track to track is
achieved by the removal of all the copper and then coating with an
insulating material.

      This process involves numerous photo-processes to create a
pattern which is coated with an etch resist allowing chemicals to
remove the unwanted copper leaving the conducting lines on the
carrier.

      A multilayer card basically involves producing thin cards using
the above process and laminating them together to form one card.  The
connection from layer to layer is produced by drilling a hole through
the complete card which intercepts the required conducting lines to
be connected together.  The complete card is then copper plated to
make connectivity between the desired layers via the drilled hole.
The etching process is then applied to the outer layers to create the
final finished conductive pattern on the outside surface of the card.

      Referring now to the drawings, in the new technique, a core
material of similar construction to an anisotropic adhesiv...