Browse Prior Art Database

Vehicle Alert and Notification System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116157D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 4 page(s) / 143K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

See, ME: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The modern automobile is composed of a complex family of interrelated systems. These systems are subject to breakage at the most inopportune times, subjecting operators to inconvenient and potentially dangerous situations. Many of these breakdowns are preventable if notification of a failing system can be effected prior to failure.

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Vehicle Alert and Notification System

      The modern automobile is composed of a complex family of
interrelated systems.  These systems are subject to breakage at the
most inopportune times, subjecting operators to inconvenient and
potentially dangerous situations.  Many of these breakdowns are
preventable if notification of a failing system can be effected prior
to failure.

      In addition, more time and money may be wasted when the correct
part is not carried by the service vehicle or tow truck.  This
results in extra towing charges as well as lost time between
breakdown and ultimate repair.

      A system, Vehicle Alert and Notification System (VANS),
provides a solution to the problems described.  The VANS system
relies on modern and, in part, existing technology to provide an
automatic notification of failure, or potential failure, of an
automotive system.  For the purposes of this document, an automotive
system is defined to be any vehicle whose motive power is provided by
a combustion engine, to include automobiles, trucks, and specialty
vehicles like RVs or mini-vans.

      VANS consists of an on-board platform, the VANS Monitor, which
provides notification of failing or failed systems to an external
agency.  VANS continues to provide the traditional operator
notification mechanism although with a much improved notification
system.  While the entire system will be discussed, it is the VANS
Monitor which is the heart of the proposed system.

The essential concept of VANS rests of marriage of the following
existing technologies:
  1.  Cellular telephony has proven a practical medium that is
growing
       in popularity.  It is this technology that will provide the
       communication mechanism between the on-board platform and the
       external agency.
  2.  Increased utilization of microprocessor chips in the control
and
       monitoring automotive systems.
  3.  Decreased costs of basic hardware such as modems, memory and
       processor boards make the VANS approach commercially
attractive.

      The VANS system uses an on-board computer to monitor automotive
systems via existing, and in some cases, newly devised chips.  These
chips generally are designed to monitor abnormal occurrences
utilizing analog measurement systems.  An example of this is a heat
sensor used to control air flow in the engine.  The VANS Monitor will
receive these notifications, translate them into a digital format
which may then be transmitted to an external agency.  Transmission
will be accomplished by utilization of existing cellular technology.

      The VANS Monitor is the heart of the VANS system, it is the
on-board platform which controls the notification of failure
potential as well as actual failure events.  The monitor is composed
of the following components which are shown in the Figure and are
described immediately following the Figure.
  o  System Ports - The sy...