Browse Prior Art Database

Low-Cost Transport Mechanism for Cartridgeless Optical Media

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116160D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lee, BS: AUTHOR

Abstract

Contrary to early promotions, optical media has proved to be quite sensitive to fingerprints, scratches, and contamination. Even in the consumer CD audio market, there are many media cleaning products. The problem is even worse with writeable media such as CD-R. This discloses a method to handle and transport cartridgeless optical media safely from a storage case to a drive or automated storage libraries. It can be made into a low-cost, hand-held tool or used as part of a robotic media access system. In both cases, data reliability and availability, as well as user confidence and convenience, will be improved.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 56% of the total text.

Low-Cost Transport Mechanism for Cartridgeless Optical Media

      Contrary to early promotions, optical media has proved to be
quite sensitive to fingerprints, scratches, and contamination.  Even
in the consumer CD audio market, there are many media cleaning
products.  The problem is even worse with writeable media such as
CD-R.  This discloses a method to handle and transport cartridgeless
optical media safely from a storage case to a drive or automated
storage libraries.  It can be made into a low-cost, hand-held tool or
used as part of a robotic media access system.  In both cases, data
reliability and availability, as well as user confidence and
convenience, will be improved.

      This invention transports a media by gripping to the flat
surface of the disk.  This has the advantage of being useful even if
the media is recessed in a carrier or tray, or if the inner disk hub
or hole is unavailable.  It grips with sufficient force to allow the
disk to be manipulated in and out of drive caddies, trays used in CD
jukeboxes, and storage boxes.  It uses the force of air pressure to
grip the disk against a sealing surface made of a soft material such
as vinyl or rubber.  Optical disks are very smooth so a good pressure
seal can be formed.  By using the force of air pressure to pull the
disk up to the seal, damage to the bottom surface is avoided; there
is no downward pressure on the disk.  Once established, an air seal
of this sort can easily hold disks, e...