Browse Prior Art Database

Window Pull-Out

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116167D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Grossman, B: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for organizing, accessing, and selecting computer windows or icons. In a preferred embodiment, a window has a graphical representation of a button on each of its four corners. If the user clicks on one of these buttons, a graphical representation of a tab may be pulled out using a mouse-driven cursor or finger in a touch-sensitive screen environment. The tab may be dragged to any location on the screen. The tab is pivoted about the corner point of the window.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 97% of the total text.

Window Pull-Out

      Disclosed is a method for organizing, accessing, and selecting
computer windows or icons.  In a preferred embodiment, a window has a
graphical representation of a button on each of its four corners.  If
the user clicks on one of these buttons, a graphical representation
of a tab may be pulled out using a mouse-driven cursor or finger in a
touch-sensitive screen environment.  The tab may be dragged to any
location on the screen.  The tab is pivoted about the corner point of
the window.

      The purpose of this invention is to make it easier to select
windows which are hidden beneath other windows.  Once the tab is
extended it can be subsequently selected to raise the window to the
foreground.  The pull-out may be retracted by clicking on a small dot
located on the end of the tab.  In addition, the pull-out may be
retracted by clicking on the window corner button.  The tab may be
color and text coded.  The tab may snap-back and disappear, or the
user can gradually push it back into the window.  The concept may
apply to icons as well as windows.  Tabs from a window may be dragged
to another window, connecting them, so that when one tab is selected
both windows pop to the foreground.  While a tab is dragged it
remains in the foreground.  When the mouse is removed from the tab,
it may either stay in the foreground or be partially hidden by other
windows.  This invention is of use to computer software
manufacturers,
or companies conce...