Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Registration and Maintenance of Virtual Memory Programs

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116169D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gadd, DJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Software tools are extremely hard to maintain and control on Virtual Memory (VM). Central tools repositories cannot alleviate the problems caused by users copying private copies onto their a-disks which are less easy to track. Some VM nodes do not regularly shadow master repositories for tools, and some do not have their own shadows at all, thereby placing the onus on users to keep personal copies of tools on their own A-disks.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Automatic Registration and Maintenance of Virtual Memory Programs

      Software tools are extremely hard to maintain and control on
Virtual Memory (VM).  Central tools repositories cannot alleviate the
problems caused by users copying private copies onto their a-disks
which are less easy to track.  Some VM nodes do not regularly shadow
master repositories for tools, and some do not have their own shadows
at all, thereby placing the onus on users to keep personal copies of
tools on their own A-disks.

      As a result, users' copies become out-of-date and the author's
time is often wasted with bug reports from out-of-date versions.
Obviously, the user suffers too also without the latest version of
the tool.

      The author also has no way of knowing who is using the tool.
Suppose the author discovers a severe bug that destroys data.  Even
though users who have obtained the tool from a repository can be
tracked, users who use the tool from a tools disk or from private
copies on their A-disk cannot be tracked.  Thus, there is no way of
alerting users of this tool.

      Moreover, while a user may dump out information relevant to a
bug in a 'trace', it may not be desirable to spend the time
transmitting
it to the author.

      By incorporating special codes in the software to be placed on
a VM system, the author can ensure that the desired information is
automatically sent to him over the system.  For example, a special
code can be incorporated which automatically sends back 'registration
tokens'.  These registration tokens are sent as punched spool files,
but they will not generate any messages for the end-user - this means
the user will not know anything about the registration (unless the
author incorporates it in the documentation) and so is unaffected by
the registration process.  (CP messages cannot be used as they are
not reliable if there are network problems - for example they will be
lost in the event of a network link being temporarily broken.)

      Upon receipt of the registration token the author can manu...