Browse Prior Art Database

Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposited Carbon as a Wear Material for Contact Data Storage Transducers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116174D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Grill, A: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Contact magnetic recording requires that the probe or magnetic sensor wear at a very low rate and that the disk surface not be worn at all by the probe during contact. In addition to being wear resistant, the wear material must also be adherent, easily processible and otherwise compatible with the construction of these devices. It is disclosed that carbon deposited by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD carbon) possesses all the required characteristics, especially when used in conjunction with a very thin interfacial layer of silicon for adhesion (*).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 65% of the total text.

Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposited Carbon as a Wear Material
for Contact Data Storage Transducers

      Contact magnetic recording requires that the probe or magnetic
sensor wear at a very low rate and that the disk surface not be worn
at all by the probe during contact.  In addition to being wear
resistant, the wear material must also be adherent, easily
processible and otherwise compatible with the construction of these
devices.  It is disclosed that carbon deposited by Plasma-Enhanced
Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD carbon) possesses all the required
characteristics, especially when used in conjunction with a very thin
interfacial layer of silicon for adhesion (*).

      A contact probe device is shown schematically in the Figure.
Thickness of the wear layer is adjusted by estimates of its lifetime
wear rate and the geometric requirements of the magnetic sensor.
Test probes were constructed with various wear materials and the wear
rates determined on a rotating disk of the type used for magnetic
recording; initial and longer term wear rates are shown in the table.
Alumina gave very high wear rates, sputtered carbons (both normal and
hydrogenated) gave significantly lower wear rates, and PECVD carbon
the lowest.

      A thin interfacial film (<100A) of silicon deposited
either by an RF sputtering or PECVD process provided excellent
adhesion between the PECVD carbon film and underlying materials.
PECVD carbon depositions were accomplished at <=180º...