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Drop Site Catalog for Leading the User through the Drag and Drop Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116208D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gest, SB: AUTHOR

Abstract

This paper presents an enhancement to the drag and drop icon that would provide more information to the user during the drag and drop process. First, a brief overview of the drag and drop process in its current form, and then an explanation of how the icon can be enhanced.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Drop Site Catalog for Leading the User through the Drag and Drop
Process

      This paper presents an enhancement to the drag and drop icon
that would provide more information to the user during the drag and
drop process.  First, a brief overview of the drag and drop process
in its current form, and then an explanation of how the icon can be
enhanced.

      Drag and drop allows the user to "pick up" objects on the
screen, "drag" them around the display, and "drop" them at a new
location, possibly in another application.  A drag and drop
transaction consists of the following actions:
  1.  A user presses and holds some assortment of modifiers and/or
       keys, usually mouse button 2, over a source object starting a
       drag transaction.  The application owning that object is the
       initiator of the drag.  The current pointer is replaced by a
drag
       icon - a picture representing the item being dragged.
  2.  The user moves the pointer.  From that time until a drop
occurs,
       the drag icon replaces the mouse pointer.  The drag icon
usually
       consists of three parts:
      o  A part representing the type of source object, such as text.
      o  A part used to show whether or not the object being dragged
          can be dropped at its current location on the screen.
      o  A part used to show what action should happen when the drop
          takes place.
  Parts of the drag icon may change shape or color as it is being
   dragged through potential drop sites, providing visual feedback
about
   possible drop sites to the user.  These changes are drag-over
effects.
   An object registered as a drop site may change visually as a drag
icon
   passes over it.  These visual cues are drag-under effects.
  3.  The user drops the object, usually by releasing the assortment
of
       modifiers and/or keys.  Locations on the screen that can
accept
       drops are drop sites, and the application owning that drop
site
       is the destination or receiver.  The drag icon can be dropped
       anywhere on the screen.  However, only certain objects have
       registered themselves as drop sites and are able to process
the
       drop.  The receiver application usually performs some action
on
       the information represented by the dragged icon.  The
initiator
       application may also perform some action based on the results
of
       a drag transaction.

Therefore, the current state o...