Browse Prior Art Database

Color Mixing Method for Parallax-Barrier Stereo Displays

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116249D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Miyazawa, A: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a computer-driven stereo display that uses a parallax barrier and a color Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) panel. The barrier has a special pattern of vertical lines whose rows are shifted by successive multiples of the width of a subpixel of the LCD (1, 2, 3, etc.) as shown in the Figure. This prevents an observer from seeing all the subpixels vertically lined up in the same column therefore, showing the same color. This pattern of lines improves the color-mixing characteristic of the stereo display.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 68% of the total text.

Color Mixing Method for Parallax-Barrier Stereo Displays

      Disclosed is a computer-driven stereo display that uses a
parallax barrier and a color Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) panel.  The
barrier has a special pattern of vertical lines whose rows are
shifted by successive multiples of the width of a subpixel of the LCD
(1, 2, 3, etc.) as shown in the Figure.  This prevents an observer
from seeing all the subpixels vertically lined up in the same column
therefore, showing the same color.  This pattern of lines improves
the color-mixing characteristic of the stereo display.

      A stereo display device based on parallax barriers uses
vertical lines to block the left-eye image from the right eye and
vice versa.  The parallax-barrier produces many thin, bright vertical
lines (or gaps between dark spaces), with a dark space between each
line, and with one line for every two columns of pixels.  The image
is recorded in strips, which are registered correctly behind the
parallax barrier.  Sitting at an average viewing distance from the
display, an observer sees all the odd-numbered columns of pixels
through the light lines with the left eye, and all the even-numbered
columns with the right eye.  In other words, the observer can
experience a sensation of stereopsis, or depth, when the left-eye
view of a stereo pair is displayed in the odd columns, and the
right-eye view is displayed in the even columns.  The system allows
the observer to view a 3D computer-gener...