Browse Prior Art Database

Magnet-Type Remote Pointer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116270D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ando, F: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a new method for manipulating a "remote pointer". A user of a view-sharing system such as a remote conferencing system moves a remote pointer to let other users know what position on the screen is shown. In the disclosed method, a "magnet-type remote pointer" moves to a position pointed at by a user, and sticks there like a magnet on a chalkboard.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 83% of the total text.

Magnet-Type Remote Pointer

      Disclosed is a new method for manipulating a "remote pointer".
A user of a view-sharing system such as a remote conferencing system
moves a remote pointer to let other users know what position on the
screen is shown.  In the disclosed method, a "magnet-type remote
pointer" moves to a position pointed at by a user, and sticks there
like a magnet on a chalkboard.

      The method uses systems connected via networks or a line.  Each
system is equipped with a pointing device, such as a mouse, and an
output device, such as a display, or with an input and output device,
such as a touch display.  All users share a single view; that is,
each display shows the same content.  In accordance with the method,
such systems can provide the following cooperative functions:
  1.  A user can stick a pointer on the screen, and the other users
can
       see its shadow.
  2.  Some or all users can share a single pointer; that is, any of
       them can move it.
  3.  Each user can operate any number of pointers.

These pointers (and their shadows) are called "magnet-type remote
pointers".

      Fig. 1 shows an example of two connected systems.  The one on
the left has a touch display, while the one on the right has a normal
display and a mouse.  Both displays show the same content.

      Figs. 2 and 3 show examples of how to use such systems.  Fig. 2
shows one way of moving the magnet-type remote pointer with a mouse.
...