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Built-In Electrical-Resistance Strain Gauge for Local Strain Measurements in BEOL Structures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116301D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chan, H: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a built-in electrical-strain gauge with micron or submicron linewidth and film thickness in between interconnects, studs and vias which can be used to measure both normal and shear strain locally in these structures.

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Built-In Electrical-Resistance Strain Gauge for Local Strain Measurements
in BEOL Structures

      Disclosed is a built-in electrical-strain gauge with micron or
submicron linewidth and film thickness in between interconnects,
studs and vias which can be used to measure both normal and shear
strain locally in these structures.

      Mechanical stress in multilevel interconnection is a problem of
growing importance in VLSI technology development.  First, the
various metallic and dielectric materials used have coefficients of
thermal expansion that differ widely from those of Si substrate.
Thermal stress will be induced by any temperature changes, during
fabrication and service operation.  Many deposition processes can
also produce films with large intrinsic stress.  Finally, the
solid-state reactions which may occur during processing usually
involve a volume change and an associated stress change.  Most of
these stresses are often quite large and may exceed the strength of
the film or interface, resulting in cracking or delamination.  The
stress-induced failure can cause yield loss in production and can be
a serious reliability problem if it is a delayed failure.

      Electrical-resistance strain gauges are commonly used in
stress-analysis work, and as sensors in transducers designed to
measure such quantities as load, torque pressure and acceleration.
Its fundamental operating principle lies on the following three vital
facts:  (1) the resistance of the...