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Distributed Bragg Reflectors with Tailored Reflectivity for Use in Compact Blue Lasers Based on Waveguide Frequency Doubling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116348D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Risk, WP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a design of distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with desired reflectivity and bandwidth characteristics. These DBR devices are fabricated by forming ion-exchanged segments in a waveguide substrate such as KTiOPO(4). One particular application is the use of such a DBR to stabilize the oscillation frequency of an extended-cavity diode laser, the infrared output of which is converted to blue using a periodically-poled waveguide for quasi-phasematched second harmonic generation (e.g., Fig. 1).

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Distributed Bragg Reflectors with Tailored Reflectivity for Use in
Compact Blue Lasers Based on Waveguide Frequency Doubling

      Disclosed is a design of distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs)
with desired reflectivity and bandwidth characteristics.  These DBR
devices are fabricated by forming ion-exchanged segments in a
waveguide substrate such as KTiOPO(4).  One particular application is
the use of such a DBR to stabilize the oscillation frequency of an
extended-cavity diode laser, the infrared output of which is
converted to blue using a periodically-poled waveguide for
quasi-phasematched second harmonic generation (e.g., Fig. 1).

      In this application, it is desirable for the DBR to have a
reflectivity of &tilde.10% and a reflection bandwidth of &tilde.1A.
The bandwidth is determined primarily by the length of the device;
for a 1A bandwidth, the required length is &tilde.2 mm.  The
reflectivity is determined by the segmentation ratio of the DBR, as
shown in Fig. 2.  In order to achieve the required reflectivity, the
segmentation ratio must be precisely controlled.  In order to ensure
that the reflectivity is within 5% of the target value of 10%, the
length of the ion-exchanged segment can deviate by no more than
0.0007 microns from the correct value.  This tolerance would be
almost impossible to achieve in practice.

      The alternative approach, disclosed here, is to use another
aspect of the geometry of the DBR to control the reflectivity.  As...