Browse Prior Art Database

DOS Protected-Mode Version of Local Area Network Server APIs

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116367D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pickering, JR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a DOS protected-mode version of the OS/2* LAN Server Application Programming Interface (API) library.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

DOS Protected-Mode Version of Local Area Network Server APIs

      Disclosed is a DOS protected-mode version of the OS/2* LAN
Server Application Programming Interface (API) library.

      LAN Server provides APIs for clients of each supported
operating system platform, including OS/2, System 7**, AIX*,
Windows***, and DOS.  Although many network users have moved from DOS
to one of the other operating system platforms, DOS remains a popular
entry-level platform for workstations on LAN Server networks.

      A recurring problem with DOS environments, however, is an
ever-increasing demand for conventional memory, where device drivers
and Terminate-and-Stay-Resident (TSR) programs can leave little
conventional memory available to other programs, such as application
programs written by third-party developers.  The problem lies in the
inability of most DOS programs to make use of extended memory --
memory located above 1MB on computers with 80286 and higher
processors.

      Applications and runtime libraries written for DOS "real mode",
(the addressing scheme for 8086/8088 processors in which programs can
access memory only up to 1MB) cannot utilize extended memory.  To
access extended memory, applications must run in "protected mode,"
supported by 80286 and higher processors.

      DOS applications can run in 80286 protected mode by utilizing
a DOS Protected Mode Interface (DPMI) supplied by a DOS extender,
such
as DOS/16M, developed by Tenberry Software.  DOS extenders using the
80286 addressing scheme make up to 16MB of extended memory available
to DOS applications on 80286 and higher processors, allowing much
greater flexibility than the 1MB addressing scheme of DOS real-mode
appl...