Browse Prior Art Database

Selectable Processor Voltage Feature

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116437D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Andric, AM: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for providing an alternative input power voltage to a microprocessor in a computing system. In a planar (system) board, input voltage lines extend from a first set of pins of a connector, while lines supplying power to the processor extend from a second set of pins of the connector. These first and second sets of pins are connected by jumpers to place the input voltage from the system power supply on the lines supplying power to the microprocessor, or by a voltage regulator card to place the output voltage of the regulator card on these lines to the microprocessor.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Selectable Processor Voltage Feature

      Disclosed is a method for providing an alternative input power
voltage to a microprocessor in a computing system.  In a planar
(system) board, input voltage lines extend from a first set of pins
of a connector, while lines supplying power to the processor extend
from a second set of pins of the connector.  These first and second
sets of pins are connected by jumpers to place the input voltage from
the system power supply on the lines supplying power to the
microprocessor, or by a voltage regulator card to place the output
voltage of the regulator card on these lines to the microprocessor.

      The Figure is a schematic diagram showing the connector 11 of
planar board 12 alternately connected to three jumpers 13 or to a
connector 14 of regulator card 15.  In planar board 12, Pins 3, 5,
and 7 are connected to lines which are otherwise connected to the
system power supply (not shown), providing 5 volts, and Pins 4, 6,
and 8 are connected to the power inputs of the microprocessor (also
not shown).  Therefore, when jumpers 13 are used to connect Pin 3 to
Pin 4, Pin 5 to Pin 6, and Pin 7 to Pin 8, 5 volts is provided as the
power input to the microprocessor.  This voltage is required for most
microprocessors.

      Certain microprocessor upgrades require an input voltage in the
range of 3.3 to 3.6 volts.  To provide for the use of such an
upgrade, connector 14 of the voltage regulator card 15 is plugged
into connector 11 in place of jumpers 13.  In this configuration, the
voltage regulator card is provided with an input voltage of 5 volts
through Pins 3, 5, and 7, electrical ground is provided through Pin
2, and the output voltage of, for example, 3.45 volts from the
voltage regulator card is provided as the input voltage to the
processor through Pins 4, 6, and 8.

      Protection against running the processor at the wrong supply
voltage is provided through Pin 1, which can be read by...