Browse Prior Art Database

Process for Wire Tacking Low Profile Head Suspension Assemblies

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116456D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Burns, J: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for tacking Magneto Resistive head lead wires to a suspension without the use of an encapsulating adhesive. Described in detail below is a process for fabricating low-profile assemblies by directly coating the lead wires with a thermoplastic adhesive. The process involves either replacing the current thermoset urethane coating with an appropriate thermoplastic, or overcoating a thermoset coating with an appropriate solvent-based thermoplastic adhesive. Wires then carrying the hot melt thermoplastic coating are strung over the suspension arm as usual and then thermocompression bonded in place. No reel-to-reel decal carriers or alignment of decals to the wires would be required with such a process.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 74% of the total text.

Process for Wire Tacking Low Profile Head Suspension Assemblies

      Disclosed is a process for tacking Magneto Resistive head lead
wires to a suspension without the use of an encapsulating adhesive.
Described in detail below is a process for fabricating low-profile
assemblies by directly coating the lead wires with a thermoplastic
adhesive.  The process involves either replacing the current
thermoset urethane coating with an appropriate thermoplastic, or
overcoating a thermoset coating with an appropriate solvent-based
thermoplastic adhesive.  Wires then carrying the hot melt
thermoplastic coating are strung over the suspension arm as usual and
then thermocompression bonded in place.  No reel-to-reel decal
carriers or alignment of decals to the wires would be required with
such a process.

      Any thermoplastic adhesive that undergoes a phase transition
(either a true melt or a glass transition) in the 125-300C range is
acceptable.  Typical, non-limiting examples include PET, PEI and PAI,
all of which are commercially available.

      Current wire coating methods draw the wire through a solvent
solution of the urethane material until the desired thickness is
achieved.  The urethane then undergoes a thermal condensation
reaction.  Once the reaction is complete, the urethane is "set" and
can not be thermally cycled above the Tg without undergoing further
crosslinking or degradation.  Conversely, thermoplastics--which can
also be coated out of solution-...