Browse Prior Art Database

Active Two-Phase Cooling with Passive Quality Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116527D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anderson, TM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method for passively controlling the quality of a two-phase mixture undergoing boiling is disclosed. The concept provides a means to enhance the thermal and hydrodynamic performance of two-phase cooling plates by ensuring that detrimental changes in the bulk vapor-liquid mixture ratio in the streamwise direction are limited. A liquid barrier phase separator is employed within the cooling plate to this end.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Active Two-Phase Cooling with Passive Quality Control

      A method for passively controlling the quality of a two-phase
mixture undergoing boiling is disclosed.  The concept provides a
means to enhance the thermal and hydrodynamic performance of
two-phase cooling plates by ensuring that detrimental changes in the
bulk vapor-liquid mixture ratio in the streamwise direction are
limited.  A liquid barrier phase separator is employed within the
cooling plate to this end.

      A method to avoid a detrimental high vapor quality in a flow
boiling system while retaining the cooling liquid at the heated
surface is disclosed.  A two-phase cooling plate (101) is attached to
an electronics module or other heat dissipating surface using
whatever scheme is applicable, grease, oil, epoxy, etc.  The cooling
plate is divided into two flow regions; A lower liquid region (102),
the liquid side, located closer to the heated surface (103), and an
upper vapor region (104), the vapor side, separated from the liquid
region by a porous liquid barrier (105) - a phase separator.  Liquid
coolant is delivered through the inlet port (106) to the lower
portion of the cooling plate; below the liquid barrier.  Boiling
(107) produces coolant vapor (108) which can easily pass through the
barrier, but the barrier retains the liquid coolant.  This ensures a
low quality (mostly liquid) mixture next to the heated surface and a
high quality (mostly vapor) mixture away from the heated surface.
Vapor is withdrawn from the module via the outlet port (109) from the
region above the liquid barrier - only high quality mixture removed.

      In one embodiment of the concept both liquid and vapor passages
(110) are in a serpentine form.  This maximizes the coverage of the
heated surface, while still allowing a reasonably high coolant flow
rate through the two-phase cooling plate.  The porous liquid barrier
can be...