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Browse Prior Art Database

Security Mode for Personal Computer Memory Card Interface Association Memory and Input/Output Cards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116535D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hickey, HF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method for providing a hardware security feature for Personal Computer Memory Card Interface Association (PCMCIA) cards is disclosed. When implemented, the security mode of the PCMCIA card disables any unauthorized user from accessing the card's data or function.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 77% of the total text.

Security Mode for Personal Computer Memory Card Interface Association
Memory and Input/Output Cards

      A method for providing a hardware security feature for Personal
Computer Memory Card Interface Association (PCMCIA) cards is
disclosed.
When implemented, the security mode of the PCMCIA card disables any
unauthorized user from accessing the card's data or function.

      The PCMCIA security mode feature is implemented by introducing
a unique storage location in either the Memory Address space or
Input/Output (I/O) Address space of the PCMCIA card architecture.
This storage location, which will be referred to as the PCMCIA
Password Register (PPR), contains a user-definable password which is
set by a software program running on the PCMCIA host system.

      Each time the PCMCIA card is initialized (Vcc power is
applied), all accesses to the card's Common Memory Address Space or
I/O Address Space are disabled by a disabling circuit in the PCMCIA
Card's PCMCIA Interface sub-system until a valid password is
transferred from the PCMCIA Host System to the PCMCIA Card's PCMCIA
Interface sub-system.  A password is considered valid if it exactly
matches the password which was originally set by the user and stored
in the PPR.

      The Figure shows the addition of the PPR in the Memory Address
space of a typical PCMCIA Card and a block representation of the
Memory and I/O disabling circuitry.  The Figure also shows a
representation of the host software which p...