Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Control for Liquid Crystal Display Screen-Off Timer by Sensing User Reaction

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116578D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jinno, M: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a power management system which can sense a user's reaction. The system can change power management timers by a user's reaction when a screen is turned off by screen-off timer.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 92% of the total text.

Automatic Control for Liquid Crystal Display Screen-Off Timer by
Sensing User Reaction

      Disclosed is a power management system which can sense a user's
reaction.  The system can change power management timers by a user's
reaction when a screen is turned off by screen-off timer.

      When the screen is turned off, an immediate action to turn
on the screen by accessing a keyboard or a mouse generally indicates
that the user wants to continue the operation and doesn't want to
turn off the screen for now.  In this case, the system makes a delay
in the next expiration of the screen-off timer.  Therefore, even if a
user set a shorter timer to conserve more power, the screen-off timer
merely bother the user.

      The Figure shows an example of the flowchart that the power
management system executes.  The system controls power supply for
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) panel on a notebook computer.  The
system counts an idle time (*1), and then compares the idle time and
a specified time (*2).  At initial state, there is no delay (delay =
0).  If the idle time is longer than the specified time, then the
system turns off screen (*3) and saves the current time in memory
(*4).  If there is a new keyboard/mouse event (*5) and if the screen
has been turned off (*6), then the screen will be turned on.  The
system compares the current time with the saved time to know the
user's reaction.  If the keyboard/mouse event occurred just after the
screen was turned off...