Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Detection of Asymmetry in Spreads of Seismic Data

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116588D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bird, CL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for early identification of geometry errors in spreads of seismic data which are undergoing a semi-automatic Quality Assurance (QA) process.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Detection of Asymmetry in Spreads of Seismic Data

      Disclosed is a method for early identification of geometry
errors in spreads of seismic data which are undergoing a
semi-automatic Quality Assurance (QA) process.

      Sites for prospective oil and gas reservoirs may be marine or
on land:  this disclosure is concerned only with the latter.  Seismic
surveys of a land area are now commonly conducted by arranging a
number of recording cables parallel to each other and generating the
sonic event - the "shot" - at a measured point along a line
orthogonal to the cables.  The term cable describes a series of
receiver stations arranged and connected along a common line.  This
is described as a 3D land survey.  After adjusting the recorded
values to allow for the distance of the shot to the receiver, the
data is plotted for inspection by a geophysicist to ensure that no
geometry errors are present.  Such errors result from one or more of
the positions recorded for the layout being incorrect, for example,
if the wrong location is given for the shot point.  The result of
such invalid geometry is a distortion of the seismic information,
which can be expensive if not detected at an early stage of
processing the data.

      One measure of the quality of the data is the flatness of the
first high-energy event across the several cables that make up a
single shot.  If that event occurs at close to the same time for each
cable, the shot may be deemed to be of good quality.  Such "good
shots" may then be passed on for subsequent processing.

      The data for a single cable comprises a set of traces.  Each
trace contains the...