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Identifying Related Windows in a Graphical User Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116589D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Slade, MD: AUTHOR

Abstract

Many computer products incorporate Graphical User Interfaces (GUI's) to display 'windows' on the screen with which the user interacts.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 57% of the total text.

Identifying Related Windows in a Graphical User Interface

      Many computer products incorporate Graphical User Interfaces
(GUI's) to display 'windows' on the screen with which the user
interacts.

      Many applications consist of several 'related' windows i.e.,
windows all spawned from the same process.  When the user is running
several applications at once it is often very hard to find out which
windows are related to which other windows.

      Depending on how exactly the application is written, the user
can sometimes click on any one window and all related windows are
brought to the foreground.  However, this is an unacceptable solution
as those windows then cover all other windows and the user's screen
is changed significantly.

      One particularly difficult scenario is running more than one
instance of the same application and having the capability to have
several identical windows on the screen at the same time without
being able to tell which windows were related to which other ones.

      The solution described below permits the user to identify which
GUI windows are related to which other windows without affecting the
layout of his screen or being dependent on having only one instance
of the application running.

      The essential step is to cause all related GUI windows to
change the mouse pointer to an image different from the normal
default mouse pointer.  The mouse pointer will then change to that
new image when over the r...