Browse Prior Art Database

User-Interface using a Frame for Tuning Parameters of Image Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116591D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 6 page(s) / 214K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kimura, M: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a user interface with a frame for tuning the parameters of an image display. This interface continuously updates a subset of a raster image in a small rectangular region called a "frame," using a set of display parameters that changes according to the motion of the mouse cursor. It enables users to check and adjust the display parameters by observing the image in the frame in real time, even when only a limited graphic performance is available. It can also be used as a magnifying glass by changing the zooming ratio and by selecting another of its functions to move the position of the frame within the entire image.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

User-Interface using a Frame for Tuning Parameters of Image Display

      Disclosed is a user interface with a frame for tuning the
parameters of an image display.  This interface continuously updates
a subset of a raster image in a small rectangular region called a
"frame," using a set of display parameters that changes according to
the motion of the mouse cursor.  It enables users to check and adjust
the display parameters by observing the image in the frame in real
time, even when only a limited graphic performance is available.  It
can also be used as a magnifying glass by changing the zooming ratio
and by selecting another of its functions to move the position of the
frame within the entire image.

      When a raster image is shown on a graphic display, various
display parameters such as the zooming ratio and contrast need to be
changed repeatedly until the user is satisfied with the appearance of
the image.  One conventional way of doing this, which is used in
displays with special hardware for speeding up graphic rendering, is
to update the whole image in real time while the parameters are
continuously changing according to the motion of a pointing device,
such as a mouse or track ball.  Because this method requires high
graphic performance, it cannot be used in the displays of
general-purpose workstations.  For such displays, a conventional
method is to update the whole image just once after the user has
selected or input a value for a parameter to be changed.  This method
is not user-friendly in that it is rather time-consuming and
complicated.

      The disclosed method realizes real-time update even on displays
with only moderate graphics performance.  It continuously updates a
subset of a raster image in a small rectangular region called a
"frame," while one or two display parameters change according to the
motion of the mouse cursor.  Because the frame can be updated much
more quickly than the whole image, even displays with only moderate
graphics performance could update it in real time.  The method has
the additional advantage that a user can compare the tuned image and
the original one during the tuning process.  Moreover, it allows the
user to discard the tuned image and rest...