Browse Prior Art Database

Hard Disk Drive Power Management

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116598D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aihara, T: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a power management technique for Hard Disk Drives (HDDs). This technique controls the power supply to the HDD by predicting the user's intention of accessing the HDD, in order to save power without reducing usability. To save power, the system should stop the power supply to components that are not currently being used. However, when an HDD is temporarily disconnected from the power supply, a user normally has to wait a few seconds after the power supply is reconnected until the HDD can actually be used.

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Hard Disk Drive Power Management

Disclosed is a power management technique for Hard Disk Drives (HDDs). This technique controls the power supply to the HDD by predicting the user's intention of accessing the HDD, in order to save power without reducing usability. To save power, the system should stop the power supply to components that are not currently being used. However, when an HDD is temporarily disconnected from the power supply, a user normally has to wait a few seconds after the power supply is reconnected until the HDD can actually be used.

Most of the time, the HDD is not being accessed by the user, and the system can disconnect it from the power supply. In most cases, it will start again after a certain input from the user. This power management system predicts a request to use it by monitoring the input from the user, and restarts the power supply before receiving an actual request, so that the user will have to wait only a short time, if at all. The system also learns the user's patterns in starting it, in order to adapt to the individual environment.

There are many ways of predicting that the user intends to access the HDD, according to the hardware and software environments. Examples include the two major environments described below.

In a keyboard-based environment, this system monitors the sequence of key inputs from the user. The Figure shows the basic concept of HDD prediction routine (1). A keyboard BIOS (2) handles keyboard I/O. The HDD predi...