Browse Prior Art Database

Integrating Speech Technology with Voice Response Units Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000116620D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hulse, BN: AUTHOR

Abstract

Many voice response systems employing voice response units (VRUs) offer base telephony function and host connectivity to allow a logical link between a voice application and the telephony network. Specialized functions, such as speech recognition and speech synthesis, are handled through an external server to be accessed and used in realtime from the base telephony application. Although appropriate APIs have been developed between VRUs and host-resident function, there is little provision for the management of external resources, other than host systems over, typically, LU2-type and LU6.2-type links. For speech technology functions, such as voice recognition and text-to-speech, the actual technology is likely to be installed on a remote machine and connected via some LAN-based protocol to the machine running the VRU.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Integrating Speech Technology with Voice Response Units Systems

      Many voice response systems employing voice response units
(VRUs) offer base telephony function and host connectivity to allow a
logical link between a voice application and the telephony network.
Specialized functions, such as speech recognition and speech
synthesis, are handled through an external server to be accessed and
used in realtime from the base telephony application.  Although
appropriate APIs have been developed between VRUs and host-resident
function, there is little provision for the management of external
resources, other than host systems over, typically, LU2-type and
LU6.2-type links.  For speech technology functions, such as voice
recognition and text-to-speech, the actual technology is likely to be
installed on a remote machine and connected via some LAN-based
protocol to the machine running the VRU.  In a typical configuration,
the host machine running the voice application will poll for resource
from the remote server and then establish some kind of LAN connection
to use the identified resource.

There are three stages:

1.    integration with the VRU system;

2.    management of the LAN connection and conversation;

3.    integration with the remote technology.

      The typical conversation between the client VRU and remote
technology server involves an initial handshake and then subsequent -
during actual application running - the request from the client for
resource from the server.  In architectures which allow an n-to-m
mapping of client and server configurations, that is any number of
clients may be connected to and make use of any number of servers, a
problem may arise when a resource request is serviced but denied by a
server; does the client wait for a given time period and re-request,
or does it issue the re...